Vegetation recovery in Arctic tundra and forest-tundra after fire.
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Vegetation recovery in Arctic tundra and forest-tundra after fire. With supplementary reports: Fuel characteristics of plant communities in the MacKenzie Delta region, by Thomas W. Sylvester; Nutrient budget changes following fire in Arctic plant communities, by Michael G. Weber. by Ross Wallace Wein

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Published by Dept. of Indian and Northern Affairs in Ottawa .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Fire ecology -- Arctic regions,
  • Tundra ecology -- Arctic regions

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsArctic Land Use Research Program., North of sixty, Weber, Michael G. Nutrient budget changes following fire in Arctic plant communities, Sylvester, Thomas W. Fuel characteristics of plant communities in the MacKenzie Delta region
The Physical Object
Paginationvi, 115 p. illus. ;
Number of Pages115
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18673136M

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Postfire vegetation recovery and tree establishment at the Arctic treeline: climate-change-vegetation- after fire near the arctic treeline, have largely focused on the long-lived Picea species. (Nomen-clature for unavailable but fire frequencies in forest-tundra (Timoney & Wein ) and tundra vegetation (Wein. tundra vegetation at the northern edge of forest tundra ecozone of Western Siberia. Using a space- for -time approach, to extrapolate the temporal trend of recovery after fire from fire. 'The response of Arctic vegetation and soils following an unusually severe tundra fire', a paper published in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B journal, chronicle her findings.   The objective of our study was to characterize the recovery of ecosystem carbon socks and vegetation communities approximately 40 years after fire in a Siberian arctic tundra ecosystem. We hypothesized that burned tundra would have higher shrub biomass, higher overall biomass, and lower soil carbon content relative to unburned tundra.

  This paper makes a series of broad recommendations concerning the understanding of damage and recovery of tundra vegetation. It deals primarily with arctic vegetation and with principles rather than specific recommendations or instructions for restoration.   In the Anaktuvuk River fire burned 1, square kilometers of Alaska’s Arctic tundra, increasing by two-fold the area burned since across the entire Arctic tundra burn resulted in the release of some teragrams of carbon—an amount equivalent to that absorbed each year for the last 25 years by the tundra ecosystem, according to a study led by University of .   In situ studies indicate that tundra vegetation typically recovers rapidly post-fire; changes in community composition are typically linked to fast-growing pioneer species and the proliferation of shrubs. These changes tend to result in rapid increases in NDVI within burns compared to surrounding undisturbed tundra (Rocha et al., ).   Zyryanova OA () Plant species diversity and recovery of forest vegetation after fire disturbance in continuous permafrost area of Siberia. In: Tanaka H (ed) Proceedings of the Fifth International Workshop on Global Change: Connection to the Arctic (GCCA5). Tsukuba University, Tsukuba, pp Google Scholar.

Wein RW () Vegetation recovery in arctic tundra and forest tundra after fire. Northern Economic Development Branch, Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, ALUR Report 74–75–62, Ottawa, Canada Google Scholar. Understanding the long-term effects of fire is necessary to predict future ecosystem changes. We used a space-for-time approach to assess vegetation recovery after fire over more than four decades. We studied soil and vegetation patterns on three large fire scars (>44, 28 and 12 years old) in dry, lichen-dominated forest tundra in Western Siberia. Multi-decadal patterns of vegetation succession after tundra fire on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska. Alaska’s Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) is one of the warmest parts of the Arctic tundra biome and tundra fires are common in its upland areas. However, scientists at the University of Alaska Fairbanks report that much of the Arctic vegetation has recovered in the North Slope tundra and that it is likely to return to its pre-fire condition.